Book Review – Inside the O’Briens by Lisa Genova

Title: Inside the O’BriensSpring Book Review Button
Author: Lisa Genova
ISBN: 781476717777
No. of Pages: 352
Genre: Contemporary Fiction
Origins: Gallery Books
Release Date: 7 April 2015

Synopsis:

“Joe O’Brien is a forty-four-year-old police officer from the Irish Catholic neighborhood of Charlestown, Massachusetts. A devoted husband, proud father of four children in their twenties, and respected officer, Joe begins experiencing bouts of disorganized thinking, uncharacteristic temper outbursts, and strange, involuntary movements. He initially attributes these episodes to the stress of his job, but as these symptoms worsen, he agrees to see a neurologist and is handed a diagnosis that will change his and his family’s lives forever: Huntington’s Disease.

Huntington’s is a lethal neurodegenerative disease with no treatment and no cure. Each of Joe’s four children has a 50 percent chance of inheriting their father’s disease, and a simple blood test can reveal their genetic fate. While watching her potential future in her father’s escalating symptoms, twenty-one-year-old daughter Katie struggles with the questions this test imposes on her young adult life. Does she want to know? What if she’s gene positive? Can she live with the constant anxiety of not knowing?

As Joe’s symptoms worsen and he’s eventually stripped of his badge and more, Joe struggles to maintain hope and a sense of purpose, while Katie and her siblings must find the courage to either live a life ‘at risk’ or learn their fate.”

Thoughts on the Novel: Inside the O’Briens by Lisa Genova explores the devastation a simple diagnosis can cause for an entire family for generations past, present, and future. Through Joe and his daughter Katie, readers get insight into the mindset of one who has Huntington’s and one who could get it. The entire family faces enormous emotional strain as they come to grips with their individual mortality and wrestle with the idea of living in the moment with a fatal prognosis.

It is as emotionally tough a novel as one would expect. The whole family cycles between the highest of highs and the lowest of lows, and the reader experiences all of it. Similarly, Joe’s and Katie’s internal battles on living with the diagnosis or the potential of one are brutal, forcing readers to confront one’s mortality alongside the O’Brien family.

Ms. Genova presents many facts about Huntington’s, and some of this does get slightly repetitive. However, given the physicality of the symptoms, there is a need for this repetition. One cannot stress enough the importance of patience and understanding when meeting someone struggling with involuntary movements or spasms because one never knows the reason behind them. More importantly, it is vital to remember that such a person still has feelings and can feel shame and embarrassment in such situations.

Through Joe and Katie, Inside the O’Briens puts a face onto a rare but devastating neurological disease. It is fair to say they put a face onto any neurological disease as they struggle to deal with the impending changes in behavior, lifestyle, finances, and pretty much everything else. It is a sobering picture of aging, but the O’Briens are the type of family to do so with dignity and love.

Inside the O'Briens by Lisa Genova

BOTTOM LINE: This is the type of book that tears one heartstrings and makes one laugh all while making one contemplate just how they would react/act should they ever get a diagnosis similar to Joe’s. It is at once tender, amusing, and sobering.

10 Responses to Book Review – Inside the O’Briens by Lisa Genova
  1. Brandie
    April 30, 2015 | 10:09 AM

    Lovely review – I’m glad to see you enjoyed this one. I definitely plan on reading it at some point.

    • Michelle
      May 10, 2015 | 11:24 AM

      Thank you! It was a beautiful book. Hard to read but still gorgeous.

  2. Diane
    May 1, 2015 | 5:19 AM

    Once again I though Genova did a great job tackling a tough subject.

    • Michelle
      May 10, 2015 | 11:25 AM

      Absolutely. She did so with grace and dignity but didn’t skimp on the difficulties surrounding the diagnosis either. It was an impressive novel.

  3. Amanda
    May 1, 2015 | 2:01 PM

    I am almost afraid to read this one. I thought Still Alice was so amazing, I just honestly don’t know if I can read something so profoundly sad again. I feel terrible saying that!

    • Michelle
      May 10, 2015 | 11:26 AM

      I know what you mean. It can be difficult, but I also think that as our parents age, it is important we understand the challenges and emotional roller coaster that comes with a life-altering diagnosis. It will help us take care of them as they require more assistance.

  4. Bookish Glamma
    May 3, 2015 | 5:50 PM

    I have been wondering about this book. I read a YA book several years ago that dealt with Huntington’s Disease. It was emotional to say the least. It was the first time that I became aware of exactly what the disease was.
    Thank you for your lovely review. I will be reading it sometime soon.

    • Michelle
      May 10, 2015 | 11:27 AM

      You are very welcome! It is a nasty disease, and while rare, it still deserves our attention and understanding. I hope you get as much out of it as I did!

  5. Joyce Abblitt
    April 6, 2017 | 4:41 AM

    Having lived my whole life (80 years) with this disorder in my family and among my relatives, I can only say that this book is well written by a very knowledgeable woman.Sometimes I had to put it down and come back later, sometimes I cried, but in the end all I wanted to know was Katie’s test result – and I didn’t get it. So I had to guess that she was ‘gene negative’. YES!!

    • Michelle
      April 12, 2017 | 3:48 PM

      Thank you for sharing! I am so glad that you found it to be well-written. I felt it was a beautiful story, but knowing that it is fairly authentic makes it even better.

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