My Favorite Things – BEA Edition

My Favorite Things Button

This is a  feature in which I want to share some of the things that have me obsessed from month-to-month, whether it is music, food, make-up, or anything else that makes me giddy during the month. This month, I share what books I picked up at BEA that I am most eager to read.

********************

July Releases – 

The Trap by Melanie Raabe

There were certain books I had earmarked as must-haves. This debut novel by Melanie Raabe was one of them.

“For 11 years, the bestselling author Linda Conrads has mystified fans by never setting foot outside her home. Haunted by the unsolved murder of her younger sister–who she discovered in a pool of blood–and the face of the man she saw fleeing the scene, Linda’s hermit existence helps her cope with debilitating anxiety. But the sanctity of her oasis is shattered when she sees her sister’s murderer on television. Hobbled by years of isolation, Linda resolves to use the plot of her next novel to lay an irresistible trap for the man. As the plan is set in motion and the past comes rushing back, Linda’s memories–and her very sanity–are called into question. Is this man a heartless killer or merely a helpless victim?”

Releases July 5th from Grand Central Publishing.

Truly Madly Guilty by Liane Moriarty

Liane Moriarty is one of those authors whose books I will grab without even reading the synopsis but with the full confidence that I am going to love them. Before anyone who was there complains, it was a total fluke I received a copy at BEA. I was only asking about getting onto a galley list for it, but the gracious person at the Macmillan booth pulled out a galley and handed it to me. I was not about to turn it down!

“Sam and Clementine have a wonderful, albeit, busy life: they have two little girls, Sam has just started a new dream job, and Clementine, a cellist, is busy preparing for the audition of a lifetime. If there’s anything they can count on, it’s each other.

Clementine and Erika are each other’s oldest friends. A single look between them can convey an entire conversation. But theirs is a complicated relationship, so when Erika mentions a last minute invitation to a barbecue with her neighbors, Tiffany and Vid, Clementine and Sam don t hesitate. Having Tiffany and Vid’s larger than life personalities there will be a welcome respite.

Two months later, it won’t stop raining, and Clementine and Sam can’t stop asking themselves the question: ‘What if we hadn’t gone’?”

Releases July 26th by Flatiron Books.

August Releases – 

The Nix by Nathan Hill

This was one of the big books at BEA this year, garnering all sorts of attention and earning a spot on the BEA Buzz list. In this year of political turmoil, it seems particularly fitting.

“Meet Samuel Andresen-Anderson: stalled writer, bored teacher at a local college, obsessive player of an online video game. He hasn’t seen his mother, Faye, since she walked out when he was a child. But then one day there she is, all over the news, throwing rocks at a presidential candidate. The media paints Faye as a militant radical with a sordid past, but as far as Samuel knows, his mother never left her small Iowa town. Which version of his mother is the true one? Determined to solve the puzzle–and finally have something to deliver to his publisher–Samuel decides to capitalize on his mother’s new fame by writing a tell-all biography, a book that will savage her intimately, publicly. But first, he has to locate her; and second, to talk to her without bursting into tears.

As Samuel begins to excavate her history, the story moves from the rural Midwest of the 1960s to New York City during the Great Recession and Occupy Wall Street to the infamous riots at the 1968 Chicago Democratic National Convention, and finally to Norway, home of the mysterious Nix that his mother told him about as a child. And in these places, Samuel will unexpectedly find that he has to rethink everything he ever knew about his mother–a woman with an epic story of her own, a story she kept hidden from the world.”

Releases August 30th from Knopf Publishing Group.

September Releases – 

Mischling by Affinity Konar

This novel by Affinity Konar was on my radar before I even started looking at the offerings at BEA. I think this is the one I was most excited to receive out of all of them.

“Pearl is in charge of: the sad, the good, the past.

Stasha must care for: the funny, the future, the bad.

It’s 1944 when the twin sisters arrive at Auschwitz with their mother and grandfather. In their benighted new world, Pearl and Stasha Zagorski take refuge in their identical natures, comforting themselves with the private language and shared games of their childhood.

As part of the experimental population of twins known as Mengele’s Zoo, the girls experience privileges and horrors unknown to others, and they find themselves changed, stripped of the personalities they once shared, their identities altered by the burdens of guilt and pain.

That winter, at a concert orchestrated by Mengele, Pearl disappears. Stasha grieves for her twin, but clings to the possibility that Pearl remains alive. When the camp is liberated by the Red Army, she and her companion Feliks–a boy bent on vengeance for his own lost twin–travel through Poland’s devastation. Undeterred by injury, starvation, or the chaos around them, motivated by equal parts danger and hope, they encounter hostile villagers, Jewish resistance fighters, and fellow refugees, their quest enabled by the notion that Mengele may be captured and brought to justice within the ruins of the Warsaw Zoo. As the young survivors discover what has become of the world, they must try to imagine a future within it.”

Releases September 6th from Lee Boudreaux Books.

Jerusalem by Alan Moore

Most people would not consider a 1,200 page behemoth as a must-read. However, when it has a killer marketing plan that includes a pin with a penis on it and is from the author who gave us V for Vendetta, I’m all in.

“Alan Moore channels both the ecstatic visions of William Blake and the theoretical physics of Albert Einstein through the hardscrabble streets and alleys of his hometown of Northampton, UK. In the half a square mile of decay and demolition that was England’s Saxon capital, eternity is loitering between the firetrap housing projects. Embedded in the grubby amber of the district’s narrative among its saints, kings, prostitutes, and derelicts, a different kind of human time is happening, a soiled simultaneity that does not differentiate between the petrol-colored puddles and the fractured dreams of those who navigate them.

Employing, a kaleidoscope of literary forms and styles that ranges from brutal social realism to extravagant children’s fantasy, from the modern stage drama to the extremes of science fiction, Jerusalem’s dizzyingly rich cast of characters includes the living, the dead, the celestial, and the infernal in an intricately woven tapestry that presents a vision of an absolute and timeless human reality in all of its exquisite, comical, and heartbreaking splendor.

In these pages lurk demons from the second-century Book of Tobit and angels with golden blood who reduce fate to a snooker tournament. Vagrants, prostitutes, and ghosts rub shoulders with Oliver Cromwell, Samuel Beckett, James Joyce’s tragic daughter Lucia, and Buffalo Bill, among many others. There is a conversation in the thunderstruck dome of St. Paul’s Cathedral, childbirth on the cobblestones of Lambeth Walk, an estranged couple sitting all night on the cold steps of a Gothic church front, and an infant choking on a cough drop for eleven chapters. An art exhibition is in preparation, and above the world a naked old man and a beautiful dead baby race along the Attics of the Breath toward the heat death of the universe.

An opulent mythology for those without a pot to piss in, through the labyrinthine streets and pages of Jerusalem tread ghosts that sing of wealth, poverty, and our threadbare millennium. They discuss English as a visionary language from John Bunyan to James Joyce, hold forth on the illusion of mortality post-Einstein, and insist upon the meanest slum as Blake’s eternal holy city.”

Releases September 13th from Liveright Publishing Corporation.

Stalking Jack the Ripper by Kerri Maniscalco

I was initially going to pass on this one, and then I saw the tagline. Plus, Jack the Ripper.

“Seventeen-year-old Audrey Rose Wadsworth was born a lord’s daughter, with a life of wealth and privilege stretched out before her. But between the social teas and silk dress fittings, she leads a forbidden secret life.

Against her stern father’s wishes and society’s expectations, Audrey often slips away to her uncle’s laboratory to study the gruesome practice of forensic medicine. When her work on a string of savagely killed corpses drags Audrey into the investigation of a serial murderer, her search for answers brings her close to her own sheltered world.”

Releases September 20th from Jimmy Patterson Publishing.

The Wonder by Emma Donoghue

Emma Donoghue gave us Room. Enough said.

“A small village in 1850s rural Ireland is baffled by Anna O’Donnell’s fast, which began as a self-inflicted and earnest expression of faith. After weeks of subsisting only on what she calls ‘manna from heaven,’ the story of the ‘miracle’ has reached a fever pitch. Tourists flock in droves to the O’Donnell family’s modest cabin hoping to witness, and an international journalist is sent to cover the sensational story. Enter Lib, an English nurse trained by Florence Nightingale who is hired to keep watch for two weeks and determine whether or not Anna is a fraud. As Anna deteriorates, Lib finds herself responsible not just for the care of a child, but for getting to the root of why the child may actually be the victim of murder in slow motion.”

Releases September 20th from Little, Brown and Company.

October Releases 

Holding Up the Universe by Jennifer Niven

We stumbled on this one by chance but knew we had to grab it since her last novel was so brilliant.

“Everyone thinks they know Libby Strout, the girl once dubbed ‘America’s Fattest Teen.’ But no one’s taken the time to look past her weight to get to know who she really is. Following her mom’s death, she’s been picking up the pieces in the privacy of her home, dealing with her heartbroken father and her own grief. Now, Libby’s ready: for high school, for new friends, for love, and for EVERY POSSIBILITY LIFE HAS TO OFFER. In that moment, I know the part I want to play here at MVB High. I want to be the girl who can do anything.

Everyone thinks they know Jack Masselin, too. Yes, he’s got swagger, but he’s also mastered the impossible art of giving people what they want, of fitting in. What no one knows is that Jack has a newly acquired secret: he can’t recognize faces. Even his own brothers are strangers to him. He’s the guy who can re-engineer and rebuild anything in new and bad-ass ways, but he can’t understand what’s going on with the inner workings of his brain. So he tells himself to play it cool: Be charming. Be hilarious. Don’t get too close to anyone.

Until he meets Libby. When the two get tangled up in a cruel high school game—which lands them in group counseling and community service—Libby and Jack are both pissed, and then surprised. Because the more time they spend together, the less alone they feel. . . . Because sometimes when you meet someone, it changes the world, theirs and yours.”

Releases October 4th from Alfred A. Knopf Books for Young Readers.

The Motion of Puppets by Keith Donohue

People trapped in puppets? Yes, please!

“In the Old City of Québec, Kay Harper falls in love with a puppet in the window of the Quatre Mains, a toy shop that is never open. She is spending her summer working as an acrobat with the cirque while her husband, Theo, is translating a biography of the pioneering photographer Eadweard Muybridge. Late one night, Kay fears someone is following her home. Surprised to see that the lights of the toy shop are on and the door is open, she takes shelter inside.

The next morning Theo wakes up to discover his wife is missing. Under police suspicion and frantic at her disappearance, he obsessively searches the streets of the Old City. Meanwhile, Kay has been transformed into a puppet, and is now a prisoner of the back room of the Quatre Mains, trapped with an odd assemblage of puppets from all over the world who can only come alive between the hours of midnight and dawn. The only way she can return to the human world is if Theo can find her and recognize her in her new form. So begins the dual odyssey of Keith Donohue’s The Motion of Puppets: of a husband determined to find his wife, and of a woman trapped in a magical world where her life is not her own.”

Releases October 4th from Picador USA.

********************

I could go on and on and on. Suffice it to say, there are some AMAZING books releasing this fall. What are you most looking forward to reading?

Share and Enjoy

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Pinterest
  • Google Plus
  • Tumblr
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS

Book Review – The City of Mirrors by Justin Cronin

The City of Mirrors by Justin Cronin

Title: The City of Mirrors Author: Justin Cronin ISBN: 9780345505002 No. of Pages: 624 Genre: Horror Origins: Ballantine Books Release Date: 24 May 2016 Synopsis: “The Twelve have been destroyed and the terrifying hundred-year reign of darkness that descended upon the world has ended. The survivors are stepping outside their walls, determined to build society…

Share and Enjoy

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Pinterest
  • Google Plus
  • Tumblr
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS

Book Review – My Best Friend’s Exorcism by Grady Hendrix

My Best Friend's Exorcism by Grady Hendrix

Title: My Best Friend’s Exorcism Author: Grady Hendrix ISBN: 9781594748622 No. of Pages: 336 Genre: Horror Origins: Quirk Books Release Date: 17 May 2016 Synopsis: “Abby and Gretchen have been best friends since fifth grade, when they bonded over a shared love of E.T., roller-skating parties, and scratch-and-sniff stickers. But when they arrive at high…

Share and Enjoy

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Pinterest
  • Google Plus
  • Tumblr
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS

It’s Monday! What Are You Reading? – 23 May 2016

It's Monday! What Are You Reading? Button

Hosted by Kathryn from Book Date, this is a weekly event to share what we’ve read in the past week and what we hope to read, plus whatever else comes to mind. To learn more about each book, just click on the book cover! FINISHED SINCE THE LAST UPDATE: Emma Cline’s debut novel is a must-read if…

Share and Enjoy

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Pinterest
  • Google Plus
  • Tumblr
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS

Sunday Reflections – 22 May 2016 – Too Much

Sunday Reflections Button

Happy Sunday! It is supposed to be sunny and almost 80 degrees today. Seriously, you cannot get any better than that for weekend weather. Unfortunately, I will be spending most of it inside…again. Holly has pictures at the studio. Since she is in so many dances this year, it means that she has to be…

Share and Enjoy

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Pinterest
  • Google Plus
  • Tumblr
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS

What’s For Dinner – Week Starting 14 May 2016

What's For Dinner Button

In an effort to be a whole lot more organized this year, and because everyone is always posting what delicious food they make, here is what I have been serving my family for the past week. I also envision this being a detailed account of how I fail miserably at meal planning when life gets…

Share and Enjoy

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Pinterest
  • Google Plus
  • Tumblr
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS

Fabulous Friday – 20 May 2016

Fabulous Friday Button

We should always find ways to celebrate the little things in life. What better day to celebrate these little things than the best day of the week? So, here are the things that make this a Fabulous Friday for me this week. NEW BOOKS – I received my two boxes of books from BEA on Tuesday. They have been…

Share and Enjoy

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Pinterest
  • Google Plus
  • Tumblr
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS

Book Review – Don’t You Cry by Mary Kubica

Don't You Cry by Mary Kubica

Title: Don’t You Cry Author: Mary Kubica ISBN: 9780778319054 No. of Pages: 384 Genre: Suspense Origins: MIRA Release Date: 17 May 2016 Synopsis: “In downtown Chicago, a young woman named Esther Vaughan disappears from her apartment without a trace. A haunting letter addressed to My Dearest is found among her possessions, leaving her friend and…

Share and Enjoy

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Pinterest
  • Google Plus
  • Tumblr
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS

Book Review – Girls on Fire by Robin Wasserman

Girls on Fire by Robin Wasserman

Title: Girls on Fire Author: Robin Wasserman ISBN: 9780062415486 No. of Pages: 368 Genre: Literary Fiction Origins: Harper Release Date: 17 May 2016 Synopsis: “On Halloween, 1991, a popular high school basketball star ventures into the woods near Battle Creek, Pennsylvania, and disappears. Three days later, he’s found with a bullet in his head and…

Share and Enjoy

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Pinterest
  • Google Plus
  • Tumblr
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS

Book Review – The Fireman by Joe Hill

The Fireman by Joe Hill

Title: The Fireman Author: Joe Hill ISBN: 9780062200631 No. of Pages: 768 Genre: Horror Origins: William Morrow Release Date: 17 May 2016 Synopsis: “No one knows exactly when it began or where it originated. A terrifying new plague is spreading like wildfire across the country, striking cities one by one: Boston, Detroit, Seattle. The doctors…

Share and Enjoy

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Pinterest
  • Google Plus
  • Tumblr
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS